Gommetrik

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mythicarticulations:

Who’s a good boy? You’re a good boy!
Who devours the flesh of mortals? You devour the flesh of mortals!

Poseable “Cerberus in a Can” now available in our Etsy shop.

(via soulwithin465)

— 14 minutes ago with 52356 notes
ursulavernon:

medievalpoc:

Stefano Della Bella
Amerique (America)
Italy (c. 1625)
Print;  Jeu de la géographie.
Harvard Art Museums

Chariot pulled by armadillos?! America wishes it was really this stylish.

ursulavernon:

medievalpoc:

Stefano Della Bella

Amerique (America)

Italy (c. 1625)

Print; Jeu de la géographie.

Harvard Art Museums

Chariot pulled by armadillos?! America wishes it was really this stylish.

— 8 hours ago with 219 notes

ursulavernon:

geardrops:

jamesthefourth:

This just showed up on my feed and now I am reblogging it because of reasons. You can’t tell me how to live my life.

this is… this is fine

I am surprisingly okay with this, and possibly I am old because what I really want is one of those pastries in the third photo.

It would be totally cool if that nice young man brought it to me, but god help him if he shows up without the pastries.

(Source: busankim)

— 15 hours ago with 64112 notes
#this is okay  #hey kelsay look 
rogmont:

I thought I’d share a strange, unexplained experience I had a good 7 or so years ago.
So this was in the autumn months, my most favorite time of the year, like it is right now… so I guess the weather made me really think about this again. This specific autumn was pretty nerve rattling and not my ideal fun time.  One night, I was riding in an old friend’s car and not really in the mood to be there, so I was staring off, just observing the sides of the road. I got into the habit of this as a kid, I’ve always adored animals so I wanted to be the extra eyes at all times to watch for little buddies who might get in harm’s way. As I was scanning the very familiar road that I know I’ve gone up and down hundreds of times in the past, I saw something at the far side of the road! It was pretty big but I couldn’t identify the creature exactly. Now, I’m pretty familiar with most mammal species, especially those found in the area, so keep in mind that I had never til now looked at a local critter and had no idea what it was. 
When the headlights hit the creature, it was already staring dead on at the vehicle. It was built like a medium-large sized dog, long skinny legs and thick chest, but with a feline face and a low hanging tail. Its fur was either black or a dark brown, the lighting wasn’t exact. Its face wasn’t like a big, wild cat, it was like a large house cat’s head was plopped onto a dog’s thick neck! Its eyes seemed too large for a dog’s and its facial shape, muzzle, ears, everything read “cat” in my head as my mind raced, trying to identify this thing. Those big eyes reflected that familiar bright green like any cat with huge, dilated pupils hanging out in the dark. That whole stretch of road, I was staring at this creature as we drove by at a decent pace, about 35 mph, I assume. So I got to look at it for a good 15 seconds or more, so this wasn’t a quick little glance. I got to examine it for a bit, much longer than I’d need to easily identify any other local animal. I even turned around to keep an eye on it until the tail lights no longer caught the shiny fur. I asked the other two people in the car if they saw it and they said they didn’t. One was looking in the other direction and the driver wasn’t really watching the sides of the road since they weren’t used to the road.
When I got back home, I told my parents about the sighting and they made these excited expressions and looked at each other. My mom told me that my dad had seen a weird, kinda big animal in the same location about 2-3 days prior. They said the description matched perfectly. We had no idea what we had seen but we haven’t seen it since.
I would joke and say that I saw the Wampus Cat, since we lived in the North-East corner of Tennessee at the time. The Cherokee tribe, my dad’s and my native blood, calls her “Ewah” and the stories differ depending on who tells them. Funnily enough, (or not so funny) I got dreadfully ill a few weeks later and didn’t recover from it fully. Dealing with symptoms that just worsened with time, almost a year later, I was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a type of cancer. Because I’m very lighthearted, I still joke that she was my bad omen or a kindly warning to my illness. I’d rather go with “kindly warning” since the creature was quite stunning! The memory is still very vivid in my mind, I’ve drawn this creature several times over the years but I finally whipped up a quick digital doodle to put along with my experience.
I’ll probably never know what that critter was. Pretty interesting to say the least.

rogmont:

I thought I’d share a strange, unexplained experience I had a good 7 or so years ago.

So this was in the autumn months, my most favorite time of the year, like it is right now… so I guess the weather made me really think about this again. This specific autumn was pretty nerve rattling and not my ideal fun time.  One night, I was riding in an old friend’s car and not really in the mood to be there, so I was staring off, just observing the sides of the road. I got into the habit of this as a kid, I’ve always adored animals so I wanted to be the extra eyes at all times to watch for little buddies who might get in harm’s way. As I was scanning the very familiar road that I know I’ve gone up and down hundreds of times in the past, I saw something at the far side of the road! It was pretty big but I couldn’t identify the creature exactly. Now, I’m pretty familiar with most mammal species, especially those found in the area, so keep in mind that I had never til now looked at a local critter and had no idea what it was. 

When the headlights hit the creature, it was already staring dead on at the vehicle. It was built like a medium-large sized dog, long skinny legs and thick chest, but with a feline face and a low hanging tail. Its fur was either black or a dark brown, the lighting wasn’t exact. Its face wasn’t like a big, wild cat, it was like a large house cat’s head was plopped onto a dog’s thick neck! Its eyes seemed too large for a dog’s and its facial shape, muzzle, ears, everything read “cat” in my head as my mind raced, trying to identify this thing. Those big eyes reflected that familiar bright green like any cat with huge, dilated pupils hanging out in the dark. That whole stretch of road, I was staring at this creature as we drove by at a decent pace, about 35 mph, I assume. So I got to look at it for a good 15 seconds or more, so this wasn’t a quick little glance. I got to examine it for a bit, much longer than I’d need to easily identify any other local animal. I even turned around to keep an eye on it until the tail lights no longer caught the shiny fur. I asked the other two people in the car if they saw it and they said they didn’t. One was looking in the other direction and the driver wasn’t really watching the sides of the road since they weren’t used to the road.

When I got back home, I told my parents about the sighting and they made these excited expressions and looked at each other. My mom told me that my dad had seen a weird, kinda big animal in the same location about 2-3 days prior. They said the description matched perfectly. We had no idea what we had seen but we haven’t seen it since.

I would joke and say that I saw the Wampus Cat, since we lived in the North-East corner of Tennessee at the time. The Cherokee tribe, my dad’s and my native blood, calls her “Ewah” and the stories differ depending on who tells them. Funnily enough, (or not so funny) I got dreadfully ill a few weeks later and didn’t recover from it fully. Dealing with symptoms that just worsened with time, almost a year later, I was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a type of cancer. Because I’m very lighthearted, I still joke that she was my bad omen or a kindly warning to my illness. I’d rather go with “kindly warning” since the creature was quite stunning! The memory is still very vivid in my mind, I’ve drawn this creature several times over the years but I finally whipped up a quick digital doodle to put along with my experience.

I’ll probably never know what that critter was. Pretty interesting to say the least.

(via thecryptocreep)

— 15 hours ago with 146 notes
coelasquid:

dickjarvisblogblog:

yugichrist:

retronauthq:

WWI: Pigeon being released from tank 
Source

During WWI, when tanks were cornered into hopeless situations, in a desperate last ditch effort they would sometimes release a pigeon. All tanks were outfitted with normally one, sometimes two pigeons, of various breeds, specifically for this purpose. The pigeon would use unfathomable power to destroy absolutely everything around it, but often would also destroy the tank it was released from and kill its occupants in the process, which is why tank operators were so hesitant to resort to releasing their pigeons. Over 10,000 people were killed during WWI from pigeon related combat alone.
The most infamous pigeon related incident during the war was at the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917, when British colonel Reginald William Edwards released an extremely powerful Szegediner Highflier pigeon from the Mark IV tank he was operating, which had become immobilized in mud and surrounded by several German Leichter Kampfwagen I tanks. The Highfligher immediately flew up to an altitude surpassing Earth’s mesosphere, then plunged back down, diving into one of the LK I tanks and creating a massive shockwave that killed over 1,500 and injured tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians alike.

KELLY YOU NE SD TO GETA BRETT AND GET OUT NOW JUSTBDRIVE DINT LOOK BACK!

Why do you think we clip their wings?

coelasquid:

dickjarvisblogblog:

yugichrist:

retronauthq:

WWI: Pigeon being released from tank 


Source

During WWI, when tanks were cornered into hopeless situations, in a desperate last ditch effort they would sometimes release a pigeon. All tanks were outfitted with normally one, sometimes two pigeons, of various breeds, specifically for this purpose. The pigeon would use unfathomable power to destroy absolutely everything around it, but often would also destroy the tank it was released from and kill its occupants in the process, which is why tank operators were so hesitant to resort to releasing their pigeons. Over 10,000 people were killed during WWI from pigeon related combat alone.

The most infamous pigeon related incident during the war was at the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917, when British colonel Reginald William Edwards released an extremely powerful Szegediner Highflier pigeon from the Mark IV tank he was operating, which had become immobilized in mud and surrounded by several German Leichter Kampfwagen I tanks. The Highfligher immediately flew up to an altitude surpassing Earth’s mesosphere, then plunged back down, diving into one of the LK I tanks and creating a massive shockwave that killed over 1,500 and injured tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians alike.

KELLY YOU NE SD TO GETA BRETT AND GET OUT NOW JUSTBDRIVE DINT LOOK BACK!

Why do you think we clip their wings?

— 16 hours ago with 2324 notes
libutron:

Japanese Rhinoceros Beetle - Allomyrina dichtoma | ©fishead2000 
Watercolor and Color pencil.
Here is a picture of an alive specimen of Allomyrina dichotoma (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae) posted a few weeks ago. 

libutron:

Japanese Rhinoceros Beetle - Allomyrina dichtoma | ©fishead2000 

Watercolor and Color pencil.

Here is a picture of an alive specimen of Allomyrina dichotoma (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae) posted a few weeks ago. 

— 1 day ago with 217 notes
krislapis:

Sorry it’s been a while since I posted some Yog art, and even longer since I posted a Yog comic! To make up for that I decided to draw one of my favorite moments from Evicted. Oh Nilesy…

krislapis:

Sorry it’s been a while since I posted some Yog art, and even longer since I posted a Yog comic! To make up for that I decided to draw one of my favorite moments from Evicted. Oh Nilesy…

(via lomadia)

— 1 day ago with 898 notes